Ever seen a floater in your eye?

Many people have. Floaters are ghost-like images that may look clouded and move as you move your eyes. They’re often made up of material that was left over after the eye was formed and that’s still floating in vitreous fluid. Floaters may also be caused by injuries, or by the deterioration of vitreous fluid in the eye.

Shapes of floaters can vary tremendously. And because they often look like familiar objects (strings, bugs, shapes), you remember seeing them and you’re curious about what they are. You may not notice a floater unless it’s in your field of vision or if it “floats” into your line of sight. You may also

They appear as small specks or particles floating inside the eye. Shapes can vary—they may look like strings, insects, or other shapes. You normally don’t notice floaters until they sometimes move into your line of sight. They may be more common against light backgrounds, or when you’re exposed to very bright light.

So, should you be worried if you see floaters? In most cases, probably not.

Floaters are very common and they usually don’t cause problems. But you should ask you eye care professional about them if they are interfering with your vision or you notice a change in frequency or size. A change may indicate that there is an issue with the eye, and the faster you have it checked, the less likely you are to have a serious problem.

DiStefano Eye Center was founded in 1982 by Dr. Deborah DiStefano. DiStefano Eye Center has performed more than 20,000 LASIK vision correction procedures and treated tens of thousands of patients for everything from routine eye examinations to vision-threatening retina diseases, glaucoma, cataracts, and other conditions.Dr. Courtney Ridner joined the practice in early 2013 and DiStefano Eye Center became the first practice in Southeast Tennessee to offer Laser-Assisted Cataract Microsurgery.

Wepatients in Southeast Tennessee, Northern Georgia, and Northwest Alabama with the care and vision technology that one would expect to have to travel to Atlanta to receive.

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